EOS Features

"WHY JOHNNY FAIN GOT SCREWED AT THE SANTA CRUZ BIG-WAVE CONTEST," BY DREW KAMPION (1969)

Excerpted from "Boy You Gotta Carry That Weight," by Drew Kampion, which ran in the March 1970 issue of SURFER. Kampion's article reported on the 1969 Smirnoff Pro-Am and the 1969 Santa Cruz Big-Wave Contest; Johnny Fain, one of the older competitors, did not place in the former and was 4th in the latter. * * * Johnny driving north in his paneled Ford Falcon wagon. Two Formula Model boards in ba...

“A GOMES FAMILY SAGA,” BY BOB COOPER (2012)

“A Gomes Family Saga,” by Bob Cooper, ran in the August 2012 issue of Surfer’s Journal. This version has been shortened and slightly edited. * * * Once again, I direct our focus to the Velzy and Jacobs shop on the border of Venice and Playa del Rey, where the usual suspects from South Bay and Malibu merged to catch up on happenings in the SoCal wave-riding culture. V and J’s unique feature was t...

"WHY GAYS DON'T SURF . . . OR DO THEY?" BY RC PENNIE, H20 MAGAZINE (1979)

"Why Gays Don't Surf . . . Or Do They?" ran in the Fall 1979 issue of H20, a Los Angeles based surf-art-culture magazine. Writer RC Pennie was a UCLA grad student in Sociology. The version below has been slightly edited. * * * Clustered together like chickens in a barnyard coop, the half-naked, sun-bronzed group of young men constantly eye the scene and continually evaluate the competition. High...

"WHY BLACKS DON'T SURF," BY EARL OFARI, H20 MAGAZINE (1979)

"Why Blacks Don't Surf" ran in the Summer 1979 issue of Los Angeles-based H20 magazine. Writer Earl Ofari, 24, was then the Public Affairs Director for radio station KPFK, and has since written more than a dozen books on race, culture, and politics. This text below has been slightly edited. * * * “I was a black man in a white world, I never had it made.” The words were not spoken by some wild-ey...

KIMO HOLLINGER'S ODE TO PAUL GEBAUER: "HE WILL ALWAYS BE MY MR. SUNSET"

This excerpt from "The Brothers," by Kimo Hollinger, ran in the Winter 2004 issue of Surfer's Journal. Photo of Gebauer (left) and Hollinger at Laniakea, in 1960, taken by John Severson. * * * Paul Gebauer knew how to surf Sunset. He had Pat Curren build him a semi-gun board that worked perfectly. It was colored a pale greenish-blue. I think Paul felt he wasn’t getting proper recognition for hi...

PAUL GEBAUER, 1964: "WHAT DOES THE CONTEST PROVE?"

"What Does the Contest Prove?" ran in the December 28, 1964, issue of the Honolulu Advertiser, during the same week at the annual Makaha International Surfing Championships. Roger Pepper, columnist for the Advertiser, wrote a short intro noting that "there are some who feel that it is bad to exploit surfing in the form of contests. Your reporter asked one of Oahu's best surfers, Paul Gebauer, to p...

WORLD CONTEST METHOD AND MADNESS IN THE '60s AND '70s

This year marks the first time in the pro surfing era where the men's and women's world titles will be determined not by a surfer's aggregate point total over an entire season, as has been the case since 1976. Instead, the top five men and top five women surfers, as ranked over the course of a seven-event season that finished last month in Mexcio, will face off in the Rip Curl WSL Finals, a one-da...

"DEAD IN THE WATER," NEW YORKER REVIEW FOR "JOHN FROM CINCINNATI" (2007)

Nancy Franklin's review for John From Cincinnati ran in the June 18, 2007, issue of the New Yorker. * * * You know how when you use a big bill to buy a train ticket or stamps from a vending machine and unexpectedly get a handful of Susan B. Anthony dollars as change you think, Oh, come on, this is no good—why didn’t the machine warn me? I’m never going to be able to get rid of these—nobody wants...

BUD HENDRICK: SURFER, SAILOR, BULLFIGHTER

A lot of surfers in the 1950s and '60s—American surfers in particular—were infatuated with bullfighting. Bud Hendrick, an Orange County surfer who and woodworker who did production shaping for Hobie Surfboards, was the only one who actually became a matador. This article is a shortened version of "Bud Hendrick's Open Doors," which ran in the August 2016 issue of Surfer's Journal. The main body of ...

“BLACK SURFERS OF THE GOLDEN STATE,” by JEFF DUCLOS (1983)

This article ran in the August 1983 issue of SURFER. It has been slightly edited and shortened. * * * In the late spring of 1951, one of the strongest south swells in memory struck the chiseled hub of California coastline known as Malibu. From point to pier the waves rattled in, cresting at a solid eight-to-ten feet. A call went out to the Malibu crew—California’s surfing elite—and they soon str...